Move D | Eastman

By now, David Moufang definitely could have done what a lot of successful DJ’s/producers seem to do and traded in on some of his critical acclaim for bigger crowds and maybe more money, riding the hype like a wave to ‘bigger and better things’. He’s definitely a name that fills a club, a name that lots of people in the UK talk about whilst sometimes (I suspect) they are not as familiar with his music as they make out (don’t get me wrong - I’m not claiming I’m a Move D expert here).

By all accounts, over the last few years and continually, he is taking the best route possible, ignoring the hype and doing the same thing he has been doing since 1994 – making timeless music with bite that’s deep enough to get lost in if you so choose. He’s earnt bigger crowds the hard way - a cursory listen through his back catalogue should rightly lead you to believe that he’s an artist who does his own thing and doesn’t bow to the trends that so often seem to dominate electronic music.

In late 2007 during my youthful inauguration proper to underground electronic music in the sub surface rooms at Fabric, Adam Beyer’s China Girl epitomised “minimal” and it’s popularity the vice like grip the subgenre seemed to have on Europe and beyond. But it was only a few months earlier that Workshop Records put out their second EP, a white label by Move D featuring Computer Flop as the highlight, a track whose warmth and humanity could be classed as the antithesis to the impersonal, mechanical music that was popular at the time.

Move D Feat. DJ Laté – Computer Flop

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Further proof of his unwillingness to compromise and desire to innovate can be found in his collaborative work with the seminal ambient producer Pete Namlook. Their CD, Travelling The Silk Route, is a stunning journey that retells sonic tales of the old asian Silk road, heavily imbibed with jazz and ethnic percussion. Of the four sections my favourite is the unhinged brass of part 2 but really the idea is that you listen to the whole disc at once to get the full experience.

Move D & Namlook – Travelling The Silk Route Pt. 2

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Having found a lot in common with Juju & Jordash he’s developed with them the Magic Mountain High Live Show and recently collaborated with them on Workshop, bringing together their collective influences, a penchant for Jazz readily apparent. David’s Hyrdophonics EP was probably the best thing he’s done in the last couple of years from my point of view but if you wander back through his seemingly endless catalogue you will eventually arrive in 1995 and at his first album, Kunststoff, where lies one of his most underatted and possibly greatest tracks, Eastman.

Despite lacking the polish of his later production it is a masterful piece of music. The inspired programming allows for emotional breakdowns in a song that still has a lot of dancefloor energy. Rising piano chords play against a de-tuned and punchy bassline, underpinned by loose broken beat percussion giving way at points to only the slurred lead melody that hits you square in the chest when allowed to play out on its own. If you can find a copy of the LP chances are it will be more than you can afford thanks to Discogs resellers - luckily for you David, being the nice guy that he is, has allowed us to put up a copy of the track for download. Hit the link below.

Move D – Eastman

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...